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Archive for the ‘Murphy Public Library films’ Category

The Murphy Library’s Thursday movie at 6 p.m. from Film Movement is the war drama, In Syria, about a mother trying to keep her family safe as war rages and a sniper waits outside her home. Read the rest of this entry »

At the beginning of World War II, as German forces are moving through western Europe, soldiers from Belgium, the British Empire and France are desperately needing evacuation in the French port city where 400,000 of them wait. But this seems impossible to pull off. Read the rest of this entry »

School has started up and the Murphy Library has a high school movie for you. A big-city boy moves with his family to a small town.   He loves to dance but soon realizes that rock music and dancing are illegal in the town. How is that going to work? Then pressure is on all the local teens with the senior prom around the corner.

This Thursday the library is showing Footloose, the 1984 film starring Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lithgow and Sarah Jessica Parker.  It’s filled with music and it will make you want to dance, especially to those songs by Kenny Loggins. Running time is 107 minutes and the film is rated PG. Read the rest of this entry »

Film Movement is taking us to the opera in their film this month. The Murphy Library is showing the documentary, The Paris Opera, this Thursday at 6 p.m., which means we also get to visit Paris in the autumn of 2015. Running time is 110 minutes and the film is not rated but may be suitable for high school students. In French with English subtitles.

Stéphane Lissner is the new director of the Paris Opera and is preparing for his first press conference.   The backstage crew and artists work toward the first performance in the new season, although a few problems get in the way. Meanwhile a young singer studies at the opera’s academy, unaware that one day he will be called upon to save the day.

The most heartfelt part of the film is the terrorist attack on Paris when the city goes into mourning.   The opera company is under extreme pressure but they continue their struggle to unite themselves and their city.

Film Movement allows us to advertise and show their films one time in public. Then it goes into the library’s collection for anyone to borrow.   Call 837-2417.

 

 

 

He is a “busker,” singing songs on a Dublin street for change. She is a Czech immigrant who throws him a coin one night. He wrote the love song he is singing and she likes it.   That, as they say, is the start of a beautiful friendship.

The Murphy Library is showing Once, the perfect Irish movie Thursday at 6 p.m. Running time is 85 minutes and the film is rated R for language, although the bad language is said with an Irish lilt, which seems to make everything sound better.

Actor and composer Glen Hansard notes in an interview that his three favorite songwriters are Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan and Van Morrison. That should prepare viewers for the music. The film won an Oscar for Best Song, Falling Slowly, written by Hansard and his co-star, Czech actress Markéta Irglová.

Both writer/director John Carney and Hansard played together in a band. They understand the magic it can create, especially in the demo session when Irglová accompanies Hansard’s guitar with her soul-searching piano and the rest of the band jumps in.

This is a great movie to see this week because next week, on Tuesday, August 21, our local singers The Pressley Girls, born and raised in Brasstown will be singing in a free concert at the Murphy Library at 6 p.m.

When the songs “Born to be Wild,” sung by Steppenwolf and “At Last,” sung by Etta James are both in a computer-animated comedy, you know you’re in for some fun. The next movie at the Murphy Library not only has you singing along, but you will be cheering for the city animals that just want a place to call home.

This Thursday at 6 p.m. the library is showing The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature, a 2017 PG-rated film about a group of animals in a town that is nothing like Murphy. They live in a quiet city park but one day the mayor decides to make it an amusement park. The animals are not amused. Running time is 91 minutes. The actors providing voices for characters include Will Arnett, Maya Rudolph, Jackie Chan, Katherine Heigl, Bobby Cannavale, and Jeff Dunham.

 

The year is 1942 and Olga, a beautiful Russian countess is in France and a member of the French Resistance. Then she is arrested for sheltering two Jewish boys. Jules is a French-Nazi collaborator assigned to investigate her case. When Olga is finally sent to a concentration camp, Helmut, a handsome, high-ranking German SS officer recognizes her, and remembers he had once fallen in love with her.

This Thursday, July 26 at 6 p.m., the Murphy Library is showing Film Movement’s selection, Paradise, from Russia, written and directed by Andrey Konchalovskiy. Running time is 130 minutes and the film is not rated but would not be appropriate for children. In Russian, German, French and Yiddish with subtitles in English.

In this Holocaust story, each character tells their story in a series of interviews and in flashbacks.   Critics raved about its black and white cinematography.

Film Movement allows us to advertise and show their films one time in public. Then it goes into the library’s collection for anyone to borrow.

Celebrating our freedom doesn’t have to end on the 4th of July, it can continue on the 5th of July watching a movie and enjoying your right to laugh at silly jokes.   This week’s library movie is about a bunny and his sisters, Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cottontail, and their need to harvest fresh vegetables from a neighbor’s garden.

This Thursday at 6 p.m. the Murphy Library is showing Peter Rabbit, the 2018 film based on Beatrix Potter’s classic tale of a rebel who likes to eat veggies someone else grows. The film is rated PG and running time is 95 minutes.

This film is a combination of animation and live action, and reviewers have noted that children laugh raucously at the goings-on. Their parents do too.

A brother and sister are driving their family’s truck on the Columbian island where they live, and accidentally run over a goat. For two siblings who do not get along, they are now drawn together to find an explanation about the wrecked truck, or else they will really have a problem.

If you like movies with feeling and some fun along with jazzy music, then Bad Lucky Goat is for you. This Film Movement movie from Columbia will be shown this Thursday at 6 p.m. at the Murphy Library. Running times is 76 minutes and the film is not rated and may not be suitable for young children. In Creole with subtitles in English.

Set on Providence Island, Columbian director Samir Oliveros’ first film has a cast of non-professional actors who live on the island. The island’s musicians composed much of the music. They go wading in the water, playing their flutes, blowing on conch shells and drumming on bottles.

Film Movement allows us to advertise and show their films one time in public. Then it goes into the library’s collection for anyone to borrow. Call 837-2417.

 

 

 

The next movie at the Murphy Library takes us to the early 1960’s folk music scene in New York’s Greenwich Village and follows a young folk singer for a week as he carries his guitar through the cold winter days struggling to find his opportunity to sing.

This Thursday at 6 p.m., the library is showing Ethan and Joel Coen’s award-winner Inside Llewyn Davis, starring Oscar Isaac and John Goodman.  Running time is 104 minutes and the film is rated R.

Folk songs fill the air such as an unreleased studio version of Bob Dylan singing “Farewell.”

A newly-divorced preschool teacher is urged by her family to get back into the dating scene by using online dating sites. How is that going to work? She also has support from her widowed father who continues to miss the love of his life, her mother. But he also is looking into dating again. So what do they learn? Nothing is easy, but it can be very funny.

This Thursday at 6 p.m. the Murphy Library is showing Must Love Dogs, a comedy romance starring Diane Lane, John Cusack and Christopher Plummer as the widowed father. Running time is 98 minutes and it is rated PG-13.

This year everyone around the world is celebrating the 100 hundredth birthday of composer, pianist, conductor, and teacher, Leonard Bernstein.

The Library of Congress has given access to its extensive collection of Bernstein’s work. He not only composed and conducted orchestras, but also helped students learn more about music. Go to   loc.gov/collections/leonard-bernstein/about-this-collection/ to see all that’s available. There is even part of the collection for teachers to use!

That other special library, the Murphy Public Library is showing West Side Story, the landmark film showcasing Bernstein’s music about two gangs in New York and a boy and girl who fall in love.

The library is showing West Side Story Thursday at 6 p.m. Running time is 153 minutes. It won 10 Oscars! And it’s always good to see again.


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