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Archive for March 2010

Hungry?

 

The Murphy Library is happy to feed your imagination.  The library is showing the children’s movie “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs,” on Thursday at 3:15 p.m. and again at 6 p.m.  If you like inventions and imaginative stories, this is the movie for you.  It is rated PG.

 

Still hungry?

 

Friends of Murphy Library is sponsoring Community Night on Monday, April 5 at Brothers Restaurant from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m.  Go and eat during those hours and Brothers will donate a portion of the night’s proceeds to the library for new books in the children’s area.

  Read the rest of this entry »

This week’s words for the 2010 Cherokee County Spelling Bee are from Greek, and can be found on the National Spelling Bee web site, http://www.myspellit.com.  

acme   democracy   topical

ergonomic   protein   angelic

android   character   chronology

cosmetic   antibiotic   hygiene

phenomenon   amnesia   pragmatic

Tim Ryan did not drive snakes out of the Murphy Library on St. Patrick’s Day.

 

He did much better. 

 

He threw a party for the librarians.

 

Ryan, a resident artist at the John C. Campbell Folk School, had the winning bid at the 2009 Friends of Murphy Library Auction and landed a dinner party to be given by Sue Ellen Woodward.

 

Then he made the party a gift to the Murphy Library staff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The staff of Murphy Public Library enjoyed a St. Patrick’s Day feast courtesy of Tim Ryan, resident artist at the John C. Campbell Folk School. Front row (l to r): Norma Smith, Lois Lenz; middle row: Evelyn Glidden, Ruthie Gentry; back row: Lizz Anderson, Charlene Davis, Tim Ryan, Jeff Murphy, Melissa Barker.

The entire Murphy Library crew sat in splendor, and wished each other, especially Ryan, Woodward, Allen and Bell, “Top of the morning and the rest of the day.”

 

 

 

Photos attached by Jane Hembree

 

 

 

The meeting room at the library is decked out in its St. Patrick’s Day finest.

Bonnie Allen, Sue Ellen Woodward and Sondra Bell are the consummate party-organizers who transformed the Murphy Library's meeting room for St. Paddy's Day.

Bonnie Allen, Sue Ellen Woodward and Sondra Bell helped transform the meeting room into a leprechaun’s lair and served up, what else, corned beef and cabbage, along with other Irish treats.

 

And many thanks to the Nantahala Regional Library staff who worked the front desk.

 The beach could be any warm spot and the couple any happy twosome.  But they are actually in Tel Aviv, Israel, the man is a Palestinian suicide bomber and the woman is an Israeli.  He’s in Israel to detonate a bomb.  But at the ultimate moment, the switch does not work.  While he waits for a new switch, he meets the woman and other Israelis he might dare call friends.

 

The Murphy Library is showing Film Movement’s powerful film, “For My Father” Thursday at 6 p.m.  It was nominated for 7 Israeli Academy Awards.  It is not rated but would not be suitable for very young children. Read the rest of this entry »

This week’s words for the 2010 Cherokee County Spelling Bee are from Spanish, and can be found on the National Spelling Bee web site, www.myspellit.com

renegade   barrio   fandango   mesa

oregano   empanada   sombrero

quesadilla   flamenco   fiesta   tomatillo

burrito   alligator   mantilla   chalupa

Actress Frances McDormand has tackled demanding roles before.  So when she was offered the toughest one of all, she didn’t flinch.  McDormand plays the mother of a brainy fifteen year-old boy in the 1970’s.  He thrives on rock music.  She fears it will destroy her family.  Then her fear is confirmed.  Rolling Stone Magazine wants him to go on tour with a rock band and write about it.

The Murphy Library is showing the coming-of-age film “Almost Famous” Thursday at 6 p.m.  Writer/director Cameron Crowe won an Oscar for his screenplay and dressed each scene in music from the likes of Simon and Garfunkel, Elton John, Black Sabbath, the Who, Joni Mitchell, the Allman Brothers, and Neil Young.   The film is rated R.

Rolling Stone doesn’t know that William Miller (Patrick Fugit) is just fifteen.  He got their attention because he’d been writing about bands in underground newspapers.  And he’s very smart: when they call him he makes his voice lower and more “grown-up.” 

Crowe based the story on his own experiences writing for Rolling Stone as a teenager.  He remembers the innocence, the decadence, and swirling all around, the music. And he remembers his mother who let him go on his journey with one rule of law: “Don’t do drugs!”

But there is something good for children in all this.  The song sung by Dr. Hook in this movie (and famous in the 1970’s) “On the Cover of Rolling Stone” was written by the children’s author, Shel Silverstein.  While this movie is rated R, there are plenty of books by Silverstein at the Murphy Library that R not!

Call the library at 837-2417.


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